USC Parsed Corpus of Old South Slavic

 

 

Codex Marianus

 

Codex Marianus is an Old Church Slavonic text of West Bulgarian provenience from the early part of the 11th century, written in Glagolitic. It consists of the Gospels from Matthew 5:23 to John 21:17 (with John 1:1-1:22 and 18:14-18:28 missing), and has approximately 58, 757 words.

 

The parsed file is based on the electronic text of Codex Marianus from Jouko Lindstedt’s Corpus Cyrillo-Methodianum Helsingiense: An Electronic Corpus of Old Church Slavonic Texts (CCMH). The electronic text itself is based on the Cyrillic transliteration of Vatroslav Jagić (1883) Mariinskoe četveroevangelije sъ priměčanijami i priloženijami. St. Petersburg: IAN

 

The manuscript of Codex Marianus consists of 173 parchment folios. The major part of the codex was discovered in 1845 in a hermitage belonging to the Monastery of the Holy Mother of God on Mt. Athos, and is now kept at the Russian State Library in Moscow. A two-folio fragment is kept at the National Library in Vienna.

 

 

Codex Zographensis

 

Codex Zographensis is an Old Church Slavonic text of West Bulgarian provenience, written in Glagolitic. It has two parts: the first (A), is from the 10th century or the early part of the 11th century, and consists of the Gospels from Matthew 3:11 to the end of John (with Matthew 16:20-24:20 missing); the second part (B), is from the late 11th century, and contains the missing Matthew 16:20-24:20. Part A is approximately 52, 332 words and Part B is approximately 4, 288 words.

                      

The parsed text is based on the electronic text of Codex Zographensis from Jouko Lindstedt’s Corpus Cyrillo-Methodianum Helsingiense: An Electronic Corpus of Old Church Slavonic Texts (CCMH). The electronic text itself is based on Vatroslav Jagić's edition, incorporating corrections by Leszek Moszyński (1961) Ze studiów nad rękopisem Kodeksu Zografskiego. Wrocław-Warszawa-Kraków.

 

The original Codex Zographensis is written on 288 parchment folios: 271 for part A and 17 for part B. (In addition to the Glagolitic codex, the manuscript also includes 16 folios containing a 13th-century Cyrillic synaxarion.) The manuscript was discovered in 1834 in the Bulgarian monastery of St. Zographos on Mt. Athos. It is now kept at the Russian National Library in St. Petersburg.

 

 

Sluck Psalter

 

Sluck Psalter is an Old Church Slavonic text from the 11th century, written in Cyrillic. It has approximately 1, 759 words. It consists of Psalm 118 (based on the Greek numbering and corresponding to Psalm 119 in the Hebrew numbering).

 

The text of Sluck Psalter is from I. Sreznevskij (1868) Drevnie Slavjanskie Pamjatniki. St. Petersburg, Imperial Academy of Sciences.

 

The manuscript of Sluck Psalter consists of 5 folios. It is now lost.

 

 

Vita Constantini

 

Vita Constantini is a 17th century copy of a now lost Old Bulgarian text (the Hilandar copy of 1625-1626). It has approximately 9,939 words.

 

The parsed file is based on the electronic text of Vita Constantini from Jouko Lindstedt’s Corpus Cyrillo-Methodianum Helsingiense: An Electronic Corpus of Old Church Slavonic Texts (CCMH). The electronic text itself is based on the edition by Fran Tomšič (in Constantinus et Methodius Thessalonicenses: Fontes, recensuerunt et illustraverunt Franciscus Grives et Franciscus Tomsic = Radovi Staroslavenskog Instituta 4, Zagreb 1960).

 

The original Vita Constantini was written in the 9th century. The earliest extant copy – the Zagreb copy by Vladislav Gramatik – is from 1469.

 

 

Vita Methodii

 

Vita Methodii is a 12th century copy (the earliest extant copy) of a now lost Old Bulgarian text. It has approximately 3,368 words.

 

The parsed file is based on the electronic text of Vita Methodii from Jouko Lindstedt's Corpus Cyrillo-Methodianum Helsingiense: An Electronic Corpus of Old Church Slavonic Texts (CCMH). The electronic text itself is based on the edition by Fran Tomšič (in Constantinus et Methodius Thessalonicenses: Fontes, recensuerunt et illustraverunt Franciscus Grives et Franciscus Tomsic = Radovi Staroslavenskog Instituta 4, Zagreb 1960).

 

The original Vita Methodii was written in the 9th century. The 12th century copy is included in the Uspenskij Sbornik.

 

 

 

Georgi Seal

 

Georgi seal is an Old Bulgarian inscription from the end of the 9th century, written in Cyrillic. It has 9 words.

 

The text of the seal is from Thomas Lysaght’s (1982) A Selection of Ancient Slav Literary Monuments. E. Becvar, Vienna.

 

Imprints from the seal were discovered in Preslav, Bulgaria in the early 1900s.

 

 

Izbulski Inscription

 

Izbulski Inscription is an Old Bulgarian inscription from the end of the 9th or the beginning of the 10th century, written in Cyrillic. It has 15 words. The inscription refers to the building of St. Vlasij (St. Blaise) church.

 

The text of the inscription is from Thomas Lysaght’s (1982) A Selection of Ancient Slav Literary Monuments. E. Becvar, Vienna.

 

The stone inscription was discovered in 1924 near Pliska, the first Bulgarian capital.

 

 

Samuil’s Inscription

 

Samuil’s Inscription is an Old Bulgarian inscription from 992-993 (the earliest dated text from the period), written in Cyrillic. It has 41 words. It is an epitaph commemorating tsar Samuil’s (997-1014) parents and brother.

 

The text of the inscription is from Alexander Schenker’s (1995) The Dawn of Slavic. Yale University Press. It was judged more accurate than the text given in Thomas Lysaght’s (1982) A Selection of Ancient Slav Literary Monuments. E. Becvar, Vienna.

 

The inscription is carved on a marble slab. The lower right corner of the slab is broken off, and the missing text has been reconstructed. The inscription was discovered in the late 1800s in the village of German near lake Prespa (in present-day Greece). It is now kept in the National History Museum in Sofia, Bulgaria.

 

 

Gigen Inscription

 

Gigen inscription is an Old Bulgarian inscription from the mid-10th century (927-969), written in Cyrillic. It has 30 words. It is a call for the condemnation of heretics.

 

The text of the inscription is from Thomas Lysaght’s (1982) A Selection of Ancient Slav Literary Monuments. E. Becvar, Vienna.

 

The inscription is carved on a limestone block discovered in 1947 near the village of Gigen, in Northwestern Bulgaria.

 

 

Mostič’s Inscription

 

Mostič’s inscription is an Old Bulgarian inscription dating from the 960s, written in Cyrillic. It has 30 words. It is an epitaph honoring the life of a senior official in the Bulgarian court under tsars Simeon (893-927) and Peter (927-969).

 

The text of the inscription is from Alexander Schenker’s (1995) The Dawn of Slavic. Yale University Press. Thomas Lysaght’s (1982) A Selection of Ancient Slav Literary Monuments. E. Becvar, Vienna was also consulted and found to contain four additional words which appear extraneous.

 

The tombstone with Mostič’s inscription was discovered in 1952 near Preslav, the ancient capital of Bulgaria. It is now kept in the National History Museum in Sofia, Bulgaria.

 

 

Temnič Inscription

 

Temnič inscription is an Old Bulgarian inscription dating from the mid 10th century, written in Cyrillic. It has 15 words. It is a prayer addressed to ten of the Martyrs of Sebastia Lake.

 

The text of the inscription is from Thomas Lysaght’s (1982) A Selection of Ancient Slav Literary Monuments. E. Becvar, Vienna.

 

 

Bitola Plaque

 

Bitola Plaque is an Old Bulgarian inscription dating from 1016 (the second oldest dated text from the period), written in Cyrillic. It has 111 words. It commemorates the building of a fortress by Ioan, a Bulgarian autocrat and nephew of tsar Samuil (997-1014), for ‘‘the refuge, salvation and life of Bulgarians”.

 

The text of the inscription is from Thomas Lysaght’s (1982) A Selection of Ancient Slav Literary Monuments. E. Becvar, Vienna.

 

The fortress stone with the inscription was discovered in 1956 in the town of Bitola (present-day Macedonia).